Odd coolant leak

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Re: Odd coolant leak

Post by rer233 » Thu Oct 24, 2013 6:13 pm

marlinh wrote:Thanks for the part number rer233. I'll see if I can get them here.

Just went to the worldpac website and the number you listed didn't work.
After reading your post, i checked the W/P site again. They listed one in NJ and one in portland (maybe you can only access the local warehouses?) Anyway, i got 'em both-now they have no stock. Seems to me you should be able to order them from your local Toy dlr. If anybody is interested, i can order 'em from our local dlr, stick 'em in an envelope and mail 'em to you. Shipping would be whatever postage is. Let me know by monday-i'll order them then (should have 'em tuesday, send 'em out wednesday.) Let me now, Rich.
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Re: Odd coolant leak

Post by marlinh » Thu Oct 24, 2013 7:11 pm

Thanks Rich, I can get them from the dealer. I just hate their elevated prices. Thanks for the offer, but it's a lot of trouble for a few o-rings.

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Re: Odd coolant leak

Post by The Professor » Fri Mar 08, 2019 8:28 am

Petros wrote:
Sun Oct 20, 2013 8:23 pm
rer233 wrote: Under no circumstances would i consider using stop leak!
Why? what do yo think might happen?...

1) all car manufacturers use some sort of stop leak in the cooling system on all new cars...

2) there is no passage way or opening within the cooling system that is small enough to trap the solid particles of the stop leak...

The car manufacturers can not chase down minor leaks in their assembly process where they roll out hundreds of cars a day out of the factories, they have used this method for many decades.
Was reading this thread for the bypass tube but stubbed my toe on misinformation. Petros, again, not trying to single you out, but the above is incorrect. At least for vehicles built in the last few decades...

I write the operator's manual for the vehicles my company produces so I get to talk with a lot of other, more specialized engineers, particularly from our suppliers. Chevron supplies our factory fill coolant. It is an ethylene glycol, nitrited organic acid technology (NOAT) extended life coolant (ELC) at a 50:50 coolant-to-distilled-water ratio. There is ZERO stop leak in our coolant.

When a vehicle at a modern production plant rolls off the line, it is immediately driven to a dynamometer and driven a few miles while alignment is verified, leaks are inspected for, etc. If a vehicle needs rework, it is pulled off line and moved to a holding area where a different group of employees does the rework. (My group works adjacent to our production facility) This isn't 1960's Detroit anymore...

As for our official stance on stop leak products, I'll pull it straight from our owner's manual:

Cooling System Sealing Additives and Soluble Oils

DO NOT use soluble oils or sealing additives.

CAUTION

The use of sealing additives or soluble oils in the cooling system can cause damage to the engine. These additives can plug various areas of the radiator, EGR system and oil cooler. The plugging of the cooling system can hamper heat transfer, causing internal engine
damage. DO NOT use sealing additives or soluble oils in the cooling system. The use of sealing additives can:

• Build up in coolant low-flow areas
• Plug the radiator and oil cooler
• Damage the water pump seal
• Damage heat transfer surfaces
• Damage seals and hoses
• Corrode brass and copper

Failure to comply may result in equipment or property damage.
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Re: Odd coolant leak

Post by splatterdog » Fri Mar 08, 2019 10:09 am

The Professor wrote:
Fri Mar 08, 2019 8:28 am
Petros wrote:
Sun Oct 20, 2013 8:23 pm
rer233 wrote: Under no circumstances would i consider using stop leak!
Why? what do yo think might happen?...

1) all car manufacturers use some sort of stop leak in the cooling system on all new cars...

2) there is no passage way or opening within the cooling system that is small enough to trap the solid particles of the stop leak...

The car manufacturers can not chase down minor leaks in their assembly process where they roll out hundreds of cars a day out of the factories, they have used this method for many decades.
Was reading this thread for the bypass tube but stubbed my toe on misinformation. Petros, again, not trying to single you out, but the above is incorrect. At least for vehicles built in the last few decades...

I write the operator's manual for the vehicles my company produces so I get to talk with a lot of other, more specialized engineers, particularly from our suppliers. Chevron supplies our factory fill coolant. It is an ethylene glycol, nitrited organic acid technology (NOAT) extended life coolant (ELC) at a 50:50 coolant-to-distilled-water ratio. There is ZERO stop leak in our coolant.

When a vehicle at a modern production plant rolls off the line, it is immediately driven to a dynamometer and driven a few miles while alignment is verified, leaks are inspected for, etc. If a vehicle needs rework, it is pulled off line and moved to a holding area where a different group of employees does the rework. (My group works adjacent to our production facility) This isn't 1960's Detroit anymore...

As for our official stance on stop leak products, I'll pull it straight from our owner's manual:

Cooling System Sealing Additives and Soluble Oils

DO NOT use soluble oils or sealing additives.

CAUTION

The use of sealing additives or soluble oils in the cooling system can cause damage to the engine. These additives can plug various areas of the radiator, EGR system and oil cooler. The plugging of the cooling system can hamper heat transfer, causing internal engine
damage. DO NOT use sealing additives or soluble oils in the cooling system. The use of sealing additives can:

• Build up in coolant low-flow areas
• Plug the radiator and oil cooler
• Damage the water pump seal
• Damage heat transfer surfaces
• Damage seals and hoses
• Corrode brass and copper

Failure to comply may result in equipment or property damage.
It's use is far less common with some of the better sealing methods, notably spring loaded vs worm gear hose clamps. But, being a Subaru guy also, you should be aware of their OE "coolant conditioner"? I believe they are they only advocates for sealer in recent memory. I view stop leak as a last resort and accordingly added some to my 75 F600 due to an external block crack likely from insufficient anti freeze(damn farmers..) Still seeps maybe a drop a day when parked but heat expansion seals it up completely during op temp.

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Re: Odd coolant leak

Post by Petros » Fri Mar 08, 2019 3:33 pm

while I do not know what is going on in current practice, it likely varys from one manufacturer to the next. Subaru sells their own version to help prolong the life of their head gaskets. But this kind of advice always comes from the factory, no matter its merits. I have been hearing this BS for almost 50 years, and have yet to ever see an engine damaged by use of stop leak (that is, use as instructed).

they will always advise against a simple fix, it is not an "authorized" repair, they want you to bring to the dealership for costly (and often unnecessary service). they even give classes for the new mechanics and service managers about how to rip off your customers, or..er offer "additional" services in a convincing way. The advise against it is out of fear, they have not tested it so advise against it. to test is a fairly costly and a prolonged undertaking, and they have no motivation to do any testing. Subaru has big motivation because their cars reputation of required head gasket repairs was becoming too well known and harms their sales.

those six reasons are complete BS. I am saying this as an engineer that has worked in the industry and in fact has assisted in the redesign of an inadequate factory cooling systems, and a new head design, that went on a 1000 hp racing engine. and on occasion have used stop leak almost always with good results, and I haven never seen damage on any car any where caused by the use of stop leak. Have you? I even once had an old diesel farm tractor that leaked like a sieve. I considered taking the massive radiator out of it to have it rebuilt, but that was a big job (the front loader had to be removed). So I dumped two large containers of Barr's stop leak in it, stopped the leak and ran without trouble for many years, and I sold it running with the stop leak holding in the coolant. I would never do that on a car, but I thought I would try it on the tractor. one container did not stop the leaks, two did.

There should be no "low flow" areas in the cooling system, unless it was a badly designed system. low flow areas cause uneven cooling and head gasket failures. Radiator sealant should not be used in the oil cooler, and using the radiator to cool the engine oil or the ATF is a bad idea, only done to lower production costs. There should NOT be any passage in the radiator or cooling system small enough to get plugged by stop leak, if there is than it is not only a bad design (that would get plugged with normal deposits and corrosion), or it was a mistake. It is bad design.

As far as damaging hoses, seals, brass, etc that happens when you put in an incompatible compound, which should not be present in any stop leak. Again since the manufacture has no say in what goes in it, they would make that stupid claim as an excuse out of ignorance. "do not do anything to your car unless we approve it". what crap! half of the car made to today come out of the factory with serious flaws, which often they have to recall. When enough complaints of failures under warranty come in, the department engineers redesing it, and than send out a service bulletin and a repair kit. sometimes they have to redeisgn the kits.

You will not impress me with "factory recommendations". I want to see data. Give me hard data that is causes harm.

If there was wide spread harm, all of the companies making stop leak would get sued into bankruptcy. Barrs Leak as been around as long as there has been cars.

Another example of this colossal ignorance and false use of claimed authority is with auto trans additives: every repair shop and every manufacturer advises against them, they want you to bring the transmission in for overhaul (which benefits who!). So many times I have had old cars with auto trans, that had shifting issues, and I put in valve body cleaner, and than drained it and installed fresh ATF. Every single time the shifting problem went away. One car we drove for another 100,000 miles after it developed shifting problems, that went away after a trans flush with cleaner additives. I figured I had nothing to loose on those, it either worked, or I needed a new transmission anyway. so far, it has always worked.

No doubt there are some aftermarket products that could be harmful, or are worthless, but as far as stop leak, I have never seen any data. Only opinions and recommendations that come from those that stand to benefit if you take their advise. Until I see hard data of actual harm, with a provable causal link, none of that factory BS will convinces me.

I have worked at big companies and know the kind of engineers that make such recommendations, and write service bulletins. Some are very competent and knowledgeable, but unfortunately many are so incompetence they could not get a job anywhere else. So they are stuck writing service adversaries approved by two levels of management. IOW, they have no special knowledge, nor authority, to make any decisions or advice for car owners. Most of them do not even work on their own cars and would not know what to if their life depended on it. Those statements are a policy position approved by management.

I do not trust anything cumming out company like that, I have been there and done that: many times bad recommendations, or bad repair instructions has come out of such organizations. I should know, I had spent 7 years reviewing and revised service bulletins that had been released to the customers that was riddled with errors, or kits with repair parts that did not even fit!
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Re: Odd coolant leak

Post by slimdude85 » Fri Mar 08, 2019 5:51 pm

I would have to agree with Petros, myself, as a whole. I could see a potential problem using stop leak in an already abused cooling system without flushing the system first. For instance, if your heater core is restricted the possibility ( unsure of probability, though) is there that the stop leak could build up on the restrictions and cause a stoppage. As far as damage by the additive independent of anything else? Doubtful. The far more likely cause of damage to any cooling system is the average Joe using the readily available additive known as tap water to keep their system full allowing for electrolysis to occur within said system, not to mention the corrosion that would occur on iron or steel parts used in the same.
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Re: Odd coolant leak

Post by The Professor » Mon Mar 11, 2019 9:51 am

I'd like to preface this by saying that I DON'T work for Subaru.
splatterdog wrote:
Fri Mar 08, 2019 10:09 am
But, being a Subaru guy also, you should be aware of their OE "coolant conditioner"?
I'm well aware of the head gasket issues of the EJ25D/251/253 engines. The root issue is the use of a graphite coated paper head gasket used on early cars. The gasket was revised to a graphite coated single-layer steel part, but didn't fix the issue permanently (120k miles or so of life on the last one, replaced by the dealer when the car was still owned by my in-laws.). The true fix (I just performed this repair last November) is to use the un-coated multi-layer steel head gaskets from the turbocharged engines. This fixes the problem 100%, as if the issue never even existed at all.

The factory-approved bottle of stop leak was a much cheaper solution versus pulling good engines to replace gaskets that had not yet failed (they all fail, poor gasket design) to get people outside the warranty window so Subaru would bare less of a financial burden. A crappy way to deal with it, but I don't work for Subaru, and the community has devised a better repair than the OEM (without resorting to stop leak products).
Petros wrote:
Fri Mar 08, 2019 3:33 pm
while I do not know what is going on in current practice, it likely varys from one manufacturer to the next. Subaru sells their own version to help prolong the life of their head gaskets.
As stated above Subaru just slapped their packaging on an existing brand of stop leak. It's cheaper to stick your finger in the dyke than to actually replace the wall.
Petros wrote:
Fri Mar 08, 2019 3:33 pm
they will always advise against a simple fix, it is not an "authorized" repair, they want you to bring to the dealership for costly (and often unnecessary service).
The simple fix, in this case, is the wrong one. You always advocate to find the problem before you start throwing parts and money at an issue. Stop leak is the lazy man's way of avoiding the work needed to find the problem.
Petros wrote:
Fri Mar 08, 2019 3:33 pm
they even give classes for the new mechanics and service managers about how to rip off your customers, or..er offer "additional" services in a convincing way.
We don't have this sort of training for our dealer groups, I'm not even sure where this idea comes from... How the individual, franchised dealerships train their own employees is up to them. Their employees are not paid by the Mothership...

Petros wrote:
Fri Mar 08, 2019 3:33 pm
The advise against it is out of fear, they have not tested it so advise against it. to test is a fairly costly and a prolonged undertaking, and they have no motivation to do any testing. Subaru has big motivation because their cars reputation of required head gasket repairs was becoming too well known and harms their sales.
How many "stop leak" products do you think are on the market around the world? Is it the responsibility of the vehicle manufacturer to test every single "snake oil" type of product before you get the vehicle? Is it their responsibility to make certain that every single component and system is universally compatible with every single chemical or potion in the aftermarket? Let's be real here, it is the customer's responsibility to follow the manufacturer's specifications. If you step outside the lines, any failures are on you.[/quote]
Petros wrote:
Fri Mar 08, 2019 3:33 pm
those six reasons are complete BS. I am saying this as an engineer that... ...assisted in the redesign of an inadequate factory cooling systems. There should be no "low flow" areas in the cooling system, unless it was a badly designed system..
So based on the above, you are aware that not every cooling system is perfect? I mean, the 300ZX you worked on needed a redesign of it's cooling system, right? Inadequate...
Petros wrote:
Fri Mar 08, 2019 3:33 pm
low flow areas cause uneven cooling and head gasket failures.
Like the 3A cylinder head, maybe?
Petros wrote:
Fri Mar 08, 2019 3:33 pm
Radiator sealant should not be used in the oil cooler.
No kidding. But if you have a leak, radiator stop leak can get into the oil system. As a design engineer, you should be thinking about worst case scenarios.
Petros wrote:
Fri Mar 08, 2019 3:33 pm
using the radiator to cool the engine oil or the ATF is a bad idea, only done to lower production costs.
It actually raises production costs. The hoses, clamps, cooler, etc. aren't free you know. Tying the oiling system into the cooling system can actually bring the engine up to temperature more quickly, improving cold-start emissions and drivability.
Petros wrote:
Fri Mar 08, 2019 3:33 pm
There should NOT be any passage in the radiator or cooling system small enough to get plugged by stop leak, if there is than it is not only a bad design (that would get plugged with normal deposits and corrosion), or it was a mistake. It is bad design.
Re-read your own comment about redesigning the 300ZX cooling system. OEM cooling systems are poorly designed and compromised, almost universally. There are LOTS of small coolant hoses on many engines that could become plugged by a large chunk of stop leak goo.
Petros wrote:
Fri Mar 08, 2019 3:33 pm
As far as damaging hoses, seals, brass, etc that happens when you put in an incompatible compound, which should not be present in any stop leak. Again since the manufacture has no say in what goes in it, they would make that stupid claim as an excuse out of ignorance. "do not do anything to your car unless we approve it". what crap!
They designed the engine, don't you think they have the final say about what goes into it? They say to lubricate the engine with oil, but they're wrong! IDIOTS! Let's use maple syrup instead!
Petros wrote:
Fri Mar 08, 2019 3:33 pm
half of the car made to today come out of the factory with serious flaws, which often they have to recall. When enough complaints of failures under warranty come in, the department engineers redesing it, and than send out a service bulletin and a repair kit. sometimes they have to redeisgn the kits.
HALF?! Seriously, HALF?! I work hand-in-hand with our warranty department. On average, I'd say each one of our vehicles averages one or two issues (outside of wear & tear or customer abuse) over its lifetime. Obviously some will have WAY more than that, some may have none. These are complex systems assembled by humans. Yes there are issues, but I see our defect reports, I'm in the warranty meetings, I read the NHTSA memos that we receive from the government.

The second part you got right. We will do nothing unless we see part failing at an accelerated rate. You have to understand the cost of redesigning things. Some stuff is easy, just spec a different, existing component. Others require new tooling be created to the tune of millions of dollars. Sometimes it's just doesn't make dollars and cents to make the update.
Petros wrote:
Fri Mar 08, 2019 3:33 pm
You will not impress me with "factory recommendations". I want to see data. Give me hard data that is causes harm.

If there was wide spread harm, all of the companies making stop leak would get sued into bankruptcy. Barrs Leak as been around as long as there has been cars.
I'm not trying to impress anyone Petros, just sharing my direct, current, industry experience. I will reach out to my contacts at Chevron and in our powertrain group to find some hard data for you.

You can't sue someone for making snake oil... Customers are the ones who use stop leak, and we can't sue them because they own the vehicle. We CAN deny them warranty claims for expressly ignoring the guidelines we provide in the operator's manual.

If you're not depending on the factory warranty, do whatever you like, the repair isn't on the manufacturer's dime anymore, they likely won't care.
Petros wrote:
Fri Mar 08, 2019 3:33 pm
No doubt there are some aftermarket products that could be harmful, or are worthless, but as far as stop leak, I have never seen any data. Only opinions and recommendations that come from those that stand to benefit if you take their advise. Until I see hard data of actual harm, with a provable causal link, none of that factory BS will convinces me.
I bet you haven't spent a whole lot of time looking into it, because it doesn't fit your narrative that stop leak is OK to use.
Petros wrote:
Fri Mar 08, 2019 3:33 pm
I have worked at big companies and know the kind of engineers that make such recommendations, and write service bulletins. Some are very competent and knowledgeable, but unfortunately many are so incompetence they could not get a job anywhere else. So they are stuck writing service adversaries approved by two levels of management. IOW, they have no special knowledge, nor authority, to make any decisions or advice for car owners. Most of them do not even work on their own cars and would not know what to if their life depended on it. Those statements are a policy position approved by management.

I do not trust anything cumming out company like that, I have been there and done that: many times bad recommendations, or bad repair instructions has come out of such organizations. I should know, I had spent 7 years reviewing and revised service bulletins that had been released to the customers that was riddled with errors, or kits with repair parts that did not even fit!
That's your experience, but it doesn't match with my current industry experience. As someone who works in the industry doing the very job you poo-poo above (writing field service documentation) I take offense to your position. I went to school for automotive design and I don't take orders lying down just because my boss says so.

You have a pretty ugly view on corporations and automotive OEMs in general. As someone who ran a small business at one point (backpacks) you should know that you need to protect the company at all costs. Sometimes that means making decisions about policy that aren't popular (Subaru and stop leak come to mind) but they keep the lights on. (Do you think Takata would be able to replace all those faulty airbags if they were forced to do it all at once, or had to pay all their fines? The company would be bankrupt and you would still have a faulty airbag in your car because the company wasn't around to produce the revised part.
slimdude85 wrote:
Fri Mar 08, 2019 5:51 pm
I would have to agree with Petros, myself, as a whole. I could see a potential problem using stop leak in an already abused cooling system without flushing the system first. For instance, if your heater core is restricted the possibility ( unsure of probability, though) is there that the stop leak could build up on the restrictions and cause a stoppage. As far as damage by the additive independent of anything else? Doubtful. The far more likely cause of damage to any cooling system is the average Joe using the readily available additive known as tap water to keep their system full allowing for electrolysis to occur within said system, not to mention the corrosion that would occur on iron or steel parts used in the same.
I agree with you there, the probability of the stop leak causing issue increases exponentially as you introduce problems or variables like low coolant levels, or excessive leaks.

The root issue with stop leak products is that they are designed to disperse and coat (to fill and stop the leak). This means that the entire inside of your engine, radiator and heater core are now coated with... something... This is a barrier to heat transfer, which CAN cause issues, which is why OEMs have language about NOT using stop leak. It's like using the tire patch goo when your tire goes flat. Does it stop the leak? Sure, for a while it will. But when you go in to have that tire replaced, you'll either be sent packing or charged extra to clean out all the stop leak goo, because wheels and tires aren't meant to be filled with crap. Just because someone makes a product doesn't mean it's worthy of use...

None of the cars on this forum are in warranty anymore, so nobody needs to worry about the OEM's stance on this. Do what you
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Re: Odd coolant leak

Post by slimdude85 » Mon Mar 11, 2019 1:07 pm

The Professor wrote:
Mon Mar 11, 2019 9:51 am
They designed the engine, don't you think they have the final say about what goes into it? They say to lubricate the engine with oil, but they're wrong! IDIOTS! Let's use maple syrup instead!
Funny story... https://youtu.be/K65LFrktU6M :lol:
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Re: Odd coolant leak

Post by Petros » Mon Mar 11, 2019 11:12 pm

You seem to be completely misunderstanding my post (and you appear to be selectively addressing my post), as well as implying things I did not say. stop leak is not "goo" it is water soluble particles (typically some sort of cellulose) that fills up tiny cracks where coolant flows through. You are correct, a plugged up cooling system could be further blocked by those particles, but a system like that needs heavy maintenance already. If I was the manufacturer I would advise against it as well. There is no benefit for manufacturers to recommend it.

I am not saying it is good or permanent solution to a coolant leak, it does not work all the time. But it can be a quick stop gap until you have a chance to do a permanent fix. And I have yet to see it cause harm on a functioning system, I have looked for supporting evidence that it causes harm. Sometimes it does not work (like on a head gasket failure or hose leak), but when it does, it can get you home without further harm faster than a waiting for tow truck (that can do considerable harm to your car).

I do not understand your statements about using the radiator to cool the trans fluid, that is never why they use the radiator to cool the ATF. Many manufactures of quality cars use a completely separate oil cooler independent of the radiator for the AFT. There is NO benefit to using the radiator to cool the ATF except it saves costs, and perhaps a bit of weight. Most autotrans must cool the fluid or it will greatly reduce the life of the auto trans.

Enough said on this topic.
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Re: Odd coolant leak

Post by The Professor » Tue Mar 12, 2019 7:42 am

Petros wrote:
Mon Mar 11, 2019 11:12 pm
You seem to be completely misunderstanding my post (and you appear to be selectively addressing my post), as well as implying things I did not say. stop leak is not "goo" it is water soluble particles (typically some sort of cellulose) that fills up tiny cracks where coolant flows through. You are correct, a plugged up cooling system could be further blocked by those particles, but a system like that needs heavy maintenance already. If I was the manufacturer I would advise against it as well. There is no benefit for manufacturers to recommend it.

I am not saying it is good or permanent solution to a coolant leak, it does not work all the time. But it can be a quick stop gap until you have a chance to do a permanent fix. And I have yet to see it cause harm on a functioning system, I have looked for supporting evidence that it causes harm. Sometimes it does not work (like on a head gasket failure or hose leak), but when it does, it can get you home without further harm faster than a waiting for tow truck (that can do considerable harm to your car).

I do not understand your statements about using the radiator to cool the trans fluid, that is never why they use the radiator to cool the ATF. Many manufactures of quality cars use a completely separate oil cooler independent of the radiator for the AFT. There is NO benefit to using the radiator to cool the ATF except it saves costs, and perhaps a bit of weight. Most autotrans must cool the fluid or it will greatly reduce the life of the auto trans.

Enough said on this topic.
I understand your position, that stop leak is safe and OK to use in the right situations. (The position on water/oil engine & trans coolers is another story however) Also, do you believe that having chunks of Kevlar floating around in your coolant is a good long-term plan for seals? Kevlar is a pretty abrasive aramid fiber.

For someone who preaches doing repairs the right way and to not dump time/effort into a repair without first finding the problem, I find your cavalier use of stop leak products to be very surprising.

I think we're also making assumptions past one another. In my experience, the type of person who invests in a stop leak product is not the sort of owner who spends a lot of money on their car, nor do they really understand their vehicle. This sort of person will probably have a cooling system that is compromised in other ways which will prevent the stop leak from working properly. This is why I have an issue with people saying its ok to use stop leak, you have to consider the lowest common denominator, the end user.

Manufacturers don't put this sort of "check your ass" language in their manuals for no good reason, its because some genius dumped stop leak into a half empty radiator because he saw his temperature gauge climbing.

Better to wait for the tow truck and not use or suggest the stop leak at all.
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1987 Subaru RX coupe
1987 Toyota Tercel SR5 wagon
1987 Subaru RX Type-RA coupe
1999 Subaru Forester S
2002 Subaru WRX sedan

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splatterdog
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Joined: Sun Mar 26, 2006 10:26 am
Location: Minnesota, USA

Re: Odd coolant leak

Post by splatterdog » Tue Mar 12, 2019 3:14 pm

I was only calling you out on the "no car in decades" claim because I figured you knew about Subaru "conditioner".

You will never write a manual long enough to cover all the things people can do to a product! Who reads the manual anyway?? lol

I once had a chevy truck towed in with completely frozen steering. Ended up being Lucas ps fluid conditioner. The ps fluid fit out the small hose leak and the owner kept adding Lucas until it was the only thing left. When its south of 20 below that stuff is a solid! Gear started moving after an almost all day thaw but the pump shaft was broken. Cost a lot more than just a hose!

gnarnold
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Posts: 325
Joined: Sat Jan 04, 2014 7:28 am
My tercel:: 1983 SR5 4x4 with a tummy tuck and a nose job and now a pace maker!
Location: jordache ,ca

Re: Odd coolant leak

Post by gnarnold » Wed Mar 13, 2019 1:31 am

Its been my experience that when using the stop leak that what ever isn't used to stop the leak ends up settling at the bottom bottom of the expansion resivoir. In have heard of people using a raw egg for leaks one time In was in an desperate situation and used black pepper it worked for a while until the smog guy put it on his dynamo and full throttled it like a jerk and rupteredthe crack at the top of the rad on the plastic part .needless to say he was a little mad that his new dynamo machine was bathed in nice hot peppery smelling coolant .300 bucks and look the other way I still passed smog .it sure was funny .
I used to laugh at the man with a pinto :lol: , until I became a humble servicer of a tercel :|

The Professor
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Joined: Wed May 12, 2010 6:38 pm
My tercel:: 1987 Tercel SR5 4WD wagon
Location: Western Washington
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Re: Odd coolant leak

Post by The Professor » Wed Mar 13, 2019 7:48 am

splatterdog wrote:
Tue Mar 12, 2019 3:14 pm
You will never write a manual long enough to cover all the things people can do to a product! Who reads the manual anyway?? lol
Hit the nail on the head there, nobody reads their manuals. :roll:
1975 Subaru SuperStar wagon
1984 Subaru Turbo-Traction wagon
1984 Subaru Turbo-Traction coupe
1987 Subaru RX coupe
1987 Toyota Tercel SR5 wagon
1987 Subaru RX Type-RA coupe
1999 Subaru Forester S
2002 Subaru WRX sedan

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splatterdog
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Posts: 1455
Joined: Sun Mar 26, 2006 10:26 am
Location: Minnesota, USA

Re: Odd coolant leak

Post by splatterdog » Wed Mar 13, 2019 10:00 am

That could be the reason for the warning- If you can not read this manual, do not use product.

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Petros
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My tercel:: '84 Tercel4wd w/extensive mods
Location: Arlington WA USA

Re: Odd coolant leak

Post by Petros » Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:54 pm

what? you mean people actually read those directions?
'87 Tercel 4wd SR5 (current engine swap project)
'84 Tercel 4wd (daily driver, with on going mods)
'92 Mazda MPV 4wd (wife's daily driver)
'85 Tercel 4wd DLX auto(daughter's daily driver)
'01 Honda Civic (other daughter's daily driver)

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