32/36 DGV Weber carburettors

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Lateer
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32/36 DGV Weber carburettors

Post by Lateer » Mon Jul 11, 2005 6:46 pm

Right.
After all the pushing and shoving on the forum, I've decided to write the definitive guide to the Weber DGV series carburetor.
This first post will include a short description of the carburetor, it's construction, a sample jet settings guide and a series of references for review.

Introduction
The Weber DGV series carburettor is a dual barrel progressive downdraught carburettor.
The various types are differentiated by their choke method and are mentioned below:-
The DGV is a standard manual choke.
The DFV is a mirror image of the DGV, for mounting on engines where the intake manifold is on the right of the engine. By mirror image, I mean that the carburettor performs identically, but everything is on the opposite side to the DGV. Most commonly found on Fords.
The DGEV has an electrically actuated automatic choke.
The DFEV is a mirror image of the DGEV.
The DGAV has a water actuated automatic choke.
The DFAV is a mirror image of the DGAV.
Each throttle valve is mounted on a separate shaft and they are of differential or progressive choke type. The linkage between the two throttle valves ensures that the secondary throttle valve does not open until the primary throttle valve is 2/3 open.
DAF, DFAV and DGAV types are equipped with a semi-automatic choke control. The carburettor is normally fitted to the engine as a single unit with both barrels feeding a common inlet manifold, the most common arrangements being a single unit feeding an inline four cylinder engine and a single unit feeding a v-type four cylinder engine
The carburettor identification mark is found on the lower flange outer surface.
Construction
The main body and cover of the DGV series are of die-cast aluminium or zinc alloy (Mazak) construction. The mounting flange is machined flat for fitting and the cover incorporates a mounting flange for the air cleaner assembly.
The throttle valves are of brass and the throttle shafts are of steel.
All fuel and air jets are of brass construction and are screwed into the main body. The emulsion tubes are also of brass construction.
Internal channels within the main body and cover are mostly drilled and are sealed with lead plugs where neccesary.
Performance
Most of the performance critera are improved byt he installation of a DGV Weber. Both mpg and horsepower are improved as the Weber has a very small input of fuel during idling and can open right up to larger than the standard Tercel carburetor.
A simple carburettor modification is not the first thing to do. As an ancient textbook on IDF Webers told me, it should be the last thing to do. Make sure your ignition system, fuel pump, rings and pistons, bearings and valve train are in good working order before you put the Weber on your car, as the carburetor will make all these systems work that much harder and possibly cause one to fail. Expensively.
Basically, performance with the DGV comes down to your right foot. If you're a leadfoot, then you'll push more fuel than is absolutely neccesary through the Weber and end up fouling plugs and coating your exhaust with fuel. If you're nice and lightfooted, then the Weber will only deliver the amount of fuel required, no more, no less.
One good idea is to listen to the note/sound of the Weber as you drive. Once you get it installed, you'll find that planting the accelerator into the floor at low rpm in a high gear leads to it bogging down and hesitating. You also get a low groan from the Weber. Doing the same at high rpm gives you a full-throated roar and pushes you back into the seat as the Weber gives the engine all it can take. Learning what the various notes mean is a neat skill to have. That way you can listen to what the carb is doing and either change up or down a gear to get best use of the engine.
Jetting
The Weber on my Tercel was sourced from a 2L Cortina and hasn't been altered since.
In the following jet settings, 1: indicates the primary barrel and 2: indicates the secondary barrel.
Aux venturi:- 1: 3.50 2: 3.50
Main jet:- 1: 1.40 2: 1.40
Idle jet:- 1: 0.60 2: 0.50
Air idle jet/hole:- 1: 1.70 2: 0.70
Emulsion tube:- 1: F50 2: F50
Air corrector jet:- 1: 1.70 2: 1.60
Accelerator pump jet: 0.50
Accelerator pump jet back bleed:- 0.30
Needle valve:- 2.00
References
Manuals
I used several manuals when researching the Weber carburetors.
The most useful are as follows:-

Weber carburettors owners workshop manual, J.H. Haynes and A.K. Legg., ISBN: 1850100616, 1850100209 (U.S.)
The Haynes carburettor manual., White, Charles., ISBN: 1859602886
Automotive Carburettor Manual (Haynes Techbooks), Chris Rogers, ISBN: 1859602886

The first on that list is the most detailed. Part 2, Chapter 7 deals exclusively with the DGV series Webers and I recommend seeing if your local library has it.

Online
<a href='http://www.google.com' target='_blank'>Google</a> will find most of the common information out there regarding Weber carburettors.
<a href='http://www.triumphspitfire.com/jets.html' target='_blank'>Triumph Spitfire</a> has the OEM jet settings for a whole heap of Weber carburettors. It's useful if you've bought a kit.
<a href='http://www.redlineweber.com/html/Tech/T ... ntents.htm' target='_blank'>Redline Weber</a> also has a good series of pages about general Weber info.
<a href='http://www.racetep.com/weber.html' target='_blank'>RaceTep</a> also has good info, but most of the stuff on the Web seems to be repetitive.
<a href='http://www.geocities.com/eraktoye/weber.pdf' target='_blank'>Weber tuning guide</a> taken from the first manual listed above. This has been the most use to me in servicing and tuning these carburetors. At the end of the file is a list of the OEM jet settings for the Weber I've got. If yours isn't listed, let me know and I'll see what I can find out. This chapter doesn't deal with the DGEV series, but they're so similar to the DGAV it makes no difference. If you aren't allowed to download it, then I'll see about putting it in a couple of other places. Maybe even here at Tercel4WD if I can.

Nothing beats a good manual that you can have open whilst you're taking things apart.

This post is by no means complete.
I'll also post some pics of my Weber conversion, but it's not that difficult. If you can take the carburettor off, you can put a Weber on.

Hope all this helps, and gets pinned, so I don't have to type it all again :)
1983 Tercel SR5 with 185/75R14 tyres, 32/36 DGAV Weber carburetor, lumpy cam and upgraded Pioneer sound system. Veteran of several fire seasons (with the scars to show it) and known as "The Racing Turtle"

Typrus
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Post by Typrus » Thu Sep 08, 2005 10:19 pm

How does having a Weber effect features like A/C, Power Steering, and the cold/fast idle? How much cooler or hotter does it run? How much actual emissions stuff is eliminated versus just things like the A/C idle-up?

What modifications are recommended in hand with this modification? I'll name a few and you can confirm/deny.
Stronger coil
High powered, lower resistance spark/ignition leads
NGK plugs (Preferrably Iridium's)


Along with checking for proper valve clearance (Should be done at 100,000 miles anyway)
Compression


Just looking for more info. Just tack anything important into the original.
RIP 10-07- 1984 Toyota Tercel SR5 4wd Wagen 6 speed

RIP 04-05- 1986 Toyota Tercel SR5 4wd Wagen 6 speed

1st Terc- 1987 Tercel SR5 4wd Wagon 6-speed, Sadly cubed

1985 Tercel Standard 4wd Wagon w/ 3-speed auto, Living a happy life in Boulder last I knew

Typrus
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Joined: Sat Oct 23, 2004 4:43 pm
Location: Colorado

Post by Typrus » Sat Sep 10, 2005 10:20 pm

How do you think this would deal with high-altitude? I live at 5400 or so. I might make the ocasional journey to 10,000 sometimes. How will it deal?
RIP 10-07- 1984 Toyota Tercel SR5 4wd Wagen 6 speed

RIP 04-05- 1986 Toyota Tercel SR5 4wd Wagen 6 speed

1st Terc- 1987 Tercel SR5 4wd Wagon 6-speed, Sadly cubed

1985 Tercel Standard 4wd Wagon w/ 3-speed auto, Living a happy life in Boulder last I knew

Lateer
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Posts: 223
Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2004 11:25 pm
Location: Tasmania, Australia

Post by Lateer » Sun Sep 11, 2005 7:38 pm

Typrus,

Regarding altitude, I have no idea. I regularly run my Tercel up to the top of Mount Wellington, and that's about 1250 metres above sea level, or something like that. It has no problems at all. I also generally run it around 700 metres above sea level as well. Again, no problems. Dunno what that is in feet.

Cold/fast idle you'll lose with the carb swap, unless you get a DGAV or DGEV Weber. The automatic chokes bring on fast idle. The manual DGV do also, but mine was a DGAV converted to have a manual choke.

Temperature doesn't change at all. My temperature tend to change with the winter/summer mix fuels, more than anything else.

The A/C idle up I have no idea. You might just have to set your idle high and hope for the best..

The Weber should be the last performance mod you make. It'll put heaps of strain on a standard ignition system, valvetrain etc. As I said in the pinned post, you should make sure all those are right before you put the Weber on.
1983 Tercel SR5 with 185/75R14 tyres, 32/36 DGAV Weber carburetor, lumpy cam and upgraded Pioneer sound system. Veteran of several fire seasons (with the scars to show it) and known as "The Racing Turtle"

Typrus
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Posts: 3049
Joined: Sat Oct 23, 2004 4:43 pm
Location: Colorado

Post by Typrus » Sun Sep 11, 2005 8:21 pm

Well, I knew you should make sure they are working right, but in reference to your statement that the exhaust will get soaked under heavy foot, I was wondering if a stronger spark would amend that.
RIP 10-07- 1984 Toyota Tercel SR5 4wd Wagen 6 speed

RIP 04-05- 1986 Toyota Tercel SR5 4wd Wagen 6 speed

1st Terc- 1987 Tercel SR5 4wd Wagon 6-speed, Sadly cubed

1985 Tercel Standard 4wd Wagon w/ 3-speed auto, Living a happy life in Boulder last I knew

Lateer
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Posts: 223
Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2004 11:25 pm
Location: Tasmania, Australia

Post by Lateer » Mon Sep 12, 2005 6:58 pm

I'm not sure about soaked. When my brother (who is a complete revhead) drives the car, I can smell fuel coming down the exhaust pipe.

The main problem is the Weber can dump way more fuel in there than there is air to burn. Hence, you get sooty, crappy plugs. At least, that's the way it was explained to me. The mechanic I was talking to demonstrated. If you plant the foot at idle, you can actually snuff out the engine.

Even the biggest spark in the world isn't going to help if there's not enough air.
1983 Tercel SR5 with 185/75R14 tyres, 32/36 DGAV Weber carburetor, lumpy cam and upgraded Pioneer sound system. Veteran of several fire seasons (with the scars to show it) and known as "The Racing Turtle"

Eatpants
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Post by Eatpants » Sun Sep 18, 2005 7:55 am

does the water actuated choke put heaps of strain on standard ignition/etc ?

im thinking of doing this to my brothers tercel very soon (i dont want it rotting in the backyard over winter

Lateer
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Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2004 11:25 pm
Location: Tasmania, Australia

Post by Lateer » Sun Oct 02, 2005 9:30 pm

Not sure entirely what you mean, here.

The water actuated choke takes a line from the water pump and uses a thermostat-type device to open and close the choke butterfly valves and brong on fast idle.

Hence, I don't think it'll have any effect on timing...
1983 Tercel SR5 with 185/75R14 tyres, 32/36 DGAV Weber carburetor, lumpy cam and upgraded Pioneer sound system. Veteran of several fire seasons (with the scars to show it) and known as "The Racing Turtle"

Typrus
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Posts: 3049
Joined: Sat Oct 23, 2004 4:43 pm
Location: Colorado

Post by Typrus » Tue Nov 15, 2005 9:04 am

I want a better flowing head. Dunno if porting has its place in a C-series head. I've heard from many places that in certain heads, like the G-series, porting will actually screw over flow.
Any thoughts?
RIP 10-07- 1984 Toyota Tercel SR5 4wd Wagen 6 speed

RIP 04-05- 1986 Toyota Tercel SR5 4wd Wagen 6 speed

1st Terc- 1987 Tercel SR5 4wd Wagon 6-speed, Sadly cubed

1985 Tercel Standard 4wd Wagon w/ 3-speed auto, Living a happy life in Boulder last I knew

Lateer
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Posts: 223
Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2004 11:25 pm
Location: Tasmania, Australia

Dunno, personally.

Post by Lateer » Tue Nov 15, 2005 3:42 pm

Typrus, I've not had the chance to play with other Toyota engines.

I've only played with the 3A and 3A-C series engines, and as such I dunno about any other heads and how they'd go with porting.

I do know that the 3A-C used to be the stock motor for the older MR-2 sportscars, and I'm sure that they would have done some modification to them, so you might try looking about on the Web for mods for a MR-2.
1983 Tercel SR5 with 185/75R14 tyres, 32/36 DGAV Weber carburetor, lumpy cam and upgraded Pioneer sound system. Veteran of several fire seasons (with the scars to show it) and known as "The Racing Turtle"

Terpocalypse
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My tercel:: 86/87

Re: 32/36 DGV Weber carburettors

Post by Terpocalypse » Mon Aug 27, 2018 12:39 am

awesome vat of knowledge thank you!!!!!
pretty much confirms to me that i should upgrade to 2BBL valve gasket and seals, and any other gasket that has an option of 2BBL, including fuel pump, Exhaust system and probably throw another fuel filter in to clean up the fuel right before it goes into the carb, spark plugs and wires, dizzy cap. am i forgetting anything? getting all my bearings done ASAP.
has anyone put a snorkel or velocity driven air pipes to their Weber?

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