Zach's 1985 Toyota Tercel DLX Hatchback

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lannvouivre
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Zach's 1985 Toyota Tercel DLX Hatchback

Post by lannvouivre » Mon Apr 20, 2015 9:55 pm

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Just picked it up from Irowiki.
Needs a little TLC. Here is MY to-do list, since I'm the resident "mechanic" (apprentice :( )


To do:

Buy:
vacuum line, fuel hose, 2 o-rings
more GUNK engine cleaner
Grey RTV silicone
4 sheets 220, 2 sheets 400 grit wet/dry paper
pipe cleaner

Do:
Finish cleaning engine/trans
Clean block surface with wire attachment; cover block surface
Remove air injection...theoretically
Remove EGR stuff temporatily and clean valve
Clean cylinder head etc
Rekey locks
Install locks
Install rear window cranks
Clean fuel sender
Check filler plug and then drain transmission
Fill trans 25% synth, rest conventional
Remove inner tie rod ends and rack boot gaiters; replace
Replace struts
Pull engine oil pan and clean it
Gasket the pan up
24 hour wait -> fill with oil, replace filter
Replace struts -> inspect insulators
Replace bypass o-rings
Install exhaust manifold and intake manifold
Modify head gasket
Install head
Set timing
Install timing cover
Bolt on downpipe
Replace thermostat
Replace heater hoses
Install water outlet housing
Install water pump pulley
Install timing cover
Install PCV grommet and PCV valve
Install steel vavuum lines
Install fuel hoses
Install carb
Install new vac lines
Hook up electricals
Replace radiator hoses
Install drain petcock
Fill with coolant
Replace spark plugs and wires
Test start
Install air cleaner

Zach needs to get it registered and we need to find out what muffler layout the welder wants to do. It will be 2" from the cat all the way back and will use a Thrush turbo muffler.

Next posts will be my progress shots.
But...did you try hitting it with a hammer?

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lannvouivre
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Re: Zach's 1985 Toyota Tercel DLX Hatchback

Post by lannvouivre » Mon Apr 20, 2015 10:00 pm

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Valve cover is off. Zach wanted a nice oil filler cap. I dug one out of my project box, popped the stupid Shocker sticker off it, and slapped that puppy on!

Image
Everything looks ok. Slight scoring on some cam lobe heels.

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Pistons look good. Cylinder walls look meh.

Image

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I'm not entirely familiar with reading valves. On my 1ZZ, they were black with either the exhaust or the intake valves slightly red. On cars with coolant getting into the cylinders, the exhaust valves would be white like this. Cylinder 4's exhaust valve is caked thick.
But...did you try hitting it with a hammer?

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Petros
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Re: Zach's 1985 Toyota Tercel DLX Hatchback

Post by Petros » Mon Apr 20, 2015 11:15 pm

those look pretty normal. I recommend replacing the exhaust valves with new ones while the head is off, and new valve stem seals too. when you get the valves out you can clean off the deposits off the underside too.
'87 Tercel 4wd SR5 (current engine swap project)
'84 Tercel 4wd (daily driver, with on going mods)
'92 Mazda MPV 4wd (wife's daily driver)
'85 Tercel 4wd DLX auto(daughter's daily driver)
'01 Honda Civic (other daughter's daily driver)

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lannvouivre
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Re: Zach's 1985 Toyota Tercel DLX Hatchback

Post by lannvouivre » Mon Apr 20, 2015 11:43 pm

Petros wrote:those look pretty normal. I recommend replacing the exhaust valves with new ones while the head is off, and new valve stem seals too. when you get the valves out you can clean off the deposits off the underside too.
I don't have a valve spring compressor tool, and my hands just aren't steady enough to hand-lap valves (I can't keep them still enough that I'm confident I wouldn't bend the valves). I know someone who could do it, but I don't know if he'd want to.

What's nice is rock auto's $3-7 valve price. My car's valves are about $12 and there are 16 of them :P
But...did you try hitting it with a hammer?

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Petros
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Re: Zach's 1985 Toyota Tercel DLX Hatchback

Post by Petros » Tue Apr 21, 2015 11:58 am

you can rent a valve spring compressor from any Autozone, Oreiley's or many NAPA stores, some of them rent them for free (you pay a deposit and get a full refund when you return the tool). Also, Rockauto has simple inexpensive valve spring compressors, you can also get them from Amazon and Ebay for cheap, well worth it. Fortunately with the Tercel, the valve springs are not so strong it takes large compressors to disassemble them.

It is important to put in new exhasut valves, the factory emissions compliant ignision timing causes the exhaust to run very hot, and usually does damage to the exhaust valves. They will eventually break off and cause a lot of damage, I have seen it several times. Your whole engine becomes scrap metal, if you are luckly only a piece breaks off and goes out the exhaust pipe and does not cause any damage. You will get to pull the head off again and replace the valve than. So either replace all the exhaust valves now, or do it later, and possibly have to replace the whole motor. I learned this the hard way. Set your spark timing at 10 deg BTDC and you will improve your power and economy, and lower the exhaust temps and preserve the life of the new exhaust valves.

I used my cordless drill to lap the valves: put lapping compound on the seat, install the valve and than chuck up the stem in the drill, reverse directions several times and pop it up and down. keep the speed low, easy peasy as the Aussies say. I can not do it by hand any more either, so I use my cordless drill. Make sure you clean everything up good when done, and lubricate the valve guides on final assembly.

The intake valves are usually good once cleaned and lapped, the exhaust seats can also take a beating, lapping the new valves in is usually good enough. If pressed for time, you can skip the lapping and allow the normal wear to eventually seat the valves too, but with a cordless drill it is a simple step to get a good seal. Improves preformance and gives the valves a longer useful life.
'87 Tercel 4wd SR5 (current engine swap project)
'84 Tercel 4wd (daily driver, with on going mods)
'92 Mazda MPV 4wd (wife's daily driver)
'85 Tercel 4wd DLX auto(daughter's daily driver)
'01 Honda Civic (other daughter's daily driver)

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lannvouivre
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Re: Zach's 1985 Toyota Tercel DLX Hatchback

Post by lannvouivre » Tue Apr 21, 2015 6:44 pm

Petros wrote:I used my cordless drill to lap the valves: put lapping compound on the seat, install the valve and than chuck up the stem in the drill, reverse directions several times and pop it up and down. keep the speed low, easy peasy as the Aussies say. I can not do it by hand any more either, so I use my cordless drill. Make sure you clean everything up good when done, and lubricate the valve guides on final assembly.

The intake valves are usually good once cleaned and lapped, the exhaust seats can also take a beating, lapping the new valves in is usually good enough. If pressed for time, you can skip the lapping and allow the normal wear to eventually seat the valves too, but with a cordless drill it is a simple step to get a good seal. Improves preformance and gives the valves a longer useful life.
That's how Fabian laps valves and I feel like I can't do it. I may disassemble and ask him to do it. I may be able to get the new exhaust valves.

I don't know if I can actually rent a little compressor (the Toyota dealership I worked at had a little one) since our auto shops didn't even have a damn piston ring compressor for rent.
But...did you try hitting it with a hammer?

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lannvouivre
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Re: Zach's 1985 Toyota Tercel DLX Hatchback

Post by lannvouivre » Wed Apr 22, 2015 11:57 am

Freeze plugs are out. Removing the A/C bracket was a pain in the ass, a P/O used different non-flanged bolts so I had to use my 1/4" drive ratchet, a size 14 mm deep socket, and butcketloads of nervous sweat to break the top bolt loose without rounding it off. So I only got the plugs out and then threw in the towel for the day.
But...did you try hitting it with a hammer?

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marlinh
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Re: Zach's 1985 Toyota Tercel DLX Hatchback

Post by marlinh » Wed Apr 22, 2015 6:09 pm

Why did you remove the frost plugs?

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Re: Zach's 1985 Toyota Tercel DLX Hatchback

Post by Petros » Wed Apr 22, 2015 8:34 pm

that is an "old school" way of doing a complete overhaul, it helps to clean out build up in the water jacket, allow for water jacket inspection, and to put fresh plugs in in case of corrosion or poor seating of the old ones. I was taught this in the overhaul class in trade school in 1974 I think. When I worked for nissan, to build a race motor we would leave the factory plugs in place on a new engine, and add some small "set" screws epoxied in place for extra reliableity. Rarely did we replace the factory freeze plugs unless there was a reason to. I have to say that on all of the Japanese engines I have overhauld since, I have yet to find (or replace) a bad factory plug. Not sure I could say that about Detroit machinery, and one of the reasons I do not care to work on them either.

Now I think it is more common to leave them in unless there is some indication that they are suspect. I have often seen that new plugs improperly installed will cause trouble, so if they are in good condition, most will just leave them in place now days.

I take the attitudes "if it ain't broke, don't fix it", saves time and money not to replace serviceable parts unless there is a reason to do it. Many of the after market parts can give you trouble as compared to the 30 year old, but still good, factory parts. Problems with the new parts caused you would not have if you just left the old one in place.
'87 Tercel 4wd SR5 (current engine swap project)
'84 Tercel 4wd (daily driver, with on going mods)
'92 Mazda MPV 4wd (wife's daily driver)
'85 Tercel 4wd DLX auto(daughter's daily driver)
'01 Honda Civic (other daughter's daily driver)

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lannvouivre
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Re: Zach's 1985 Toyota Tercel DLX Hatchback

Post by lannvouivre » Wed Apr 22, 2015 9:50 pm

marlinh wrote:Why did you remove the frost plugs?
Cuz they were $2.40 for a set and I have seen them leak on other cars a lot, although these were domestic cars I saw it on. I figured I might do it just since I never got a chance to do them before.
But...did you try hitting it with a hammer?

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marlinh
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Re: Zach's 1985 Toyota Tercel DLX Hatchback

Post by marlinh » Thu Apr 23, 2015 6:05 pm

I agree with you Peter. The only time I would remove a frost plug is if it is leaking or I am installing a block heater.

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Petros
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Re: Zach's 1985 Toyota Tercel DLX Hatchback

Post by Petros » Thu Apr 23, 2015 6:33 pm

On domestic cars and trucks they are notorious for leaking, hence the normal overhaul procedure is to replace them on Detroit machinery. Never had to do it on a Japanese car yet. I find this is true for a lot of parts on Japanese made cars, crack checking heads and blocks for example, Never found a crack in any Japanese block or head, no matter how badly abused or overheated, much better quality.
'87 Tercel 4wd SR5 (current engine swap project)
'84 Tercel 4wd (daily driver, with on going mods)
'92 Mazda MPV 4wd (wife's daily driver)
'85 Tercel 4wd DLX auto(daughter's daily driver)
'01 Honda Civic (other daughter's daily driver)

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lannvouivre
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My tercel:: 2006 Pontiac Vibe
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Re: Zach's 1985 Toyota Tercel DLX Hatchback

Post by lannvouivre » Thu Apr 23, 2015 11:06 pm

Petros wrote:I take the attitudes "if it ain't broke, don't fix it", saves time and money not to replace serviceable parts unless there is a reason to do it. Many of the after market parts can give you trouble as compared to the 30 year old, but still good, factory parts. Problems with the new parts caused you would not have if you just left the old one in place.
Some of the freeze plugs looked like a P/O had put tap water in it, it was pretty gross. Two of the plugs were clean. The 40 mm was caked with some sort of deposits, though. Irowiki replaced the radiator before I got it, so at least there's that.

I also found deposits inside the water pump housing.

I have been scraping oil off the underside of the engine and all over everything below it and around it, including the transmission and steering rack. The boot gaiters on the rack are so gone I could see the teeth on the rack. Worse, the new inner tie rods arrived. They were out of their boxes and the pair only had ONE claw washer and ONE metal sleeve between them. I don't see a sleeve in the service manual, so...

The struts/shocks are in so I can replace those. I think the car will need an alignment after. I know the rears are beyond blown because 1. extreme negative camber, and 2. bouncing. The front ones seem fine but my BF wanted to replace them anyway.

Also, the stiffener plate was held on with a single bolt on the driver's side, and may be completely gone on the driver's side. Isn't that awesome? I'll check tomorrow. I am so thrilled that a P/O lost tons of fasteners and now I get to replace them all with proper flanged ones from the supply down the block.

Exhaust valves and stem seals will be here within the next 7 days, hopefully.
But...did you try hitting it with a hammer?

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Re: Zach's 1985 Toyota Tercel DLX Hatchback

Post by irowiki » Thu Apr 23, 2015 11:48 pm

How are those tires holding up?
Former Tercel Enthusiast (not a practical family car anymore but they still have a place in my heart)

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lannvouivre
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Re: Zach's 1985 Toyota Tercel DLX Hatchback

Post by lannvouivre » Fri Apr 24, 2015 2:14 am

irowiki wrote:How are those tires holding up?
They looked fine when we got home despite the wrong camber in back. We'll still need to replace them ASAP (his gdad's 8 year old tires which had almost always been in the garage had to be replaced when a huge piece of one flew off so hard it dented the wheel well).
But...did you try hitting it with a hammer?

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